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Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury report

Liverpool On Top.
Penalties Mark Derby Game.
Kane’s Skill in Goal.
By “Bee.”

Liverpool won at Anfield yesterday against their neighbours, Everton, by two goals to one –a just margin and revenge for the defeat sustained earlier in the season. That gate was a remarkable one for a mid-week, 35 spectators making a sum of £1,850. With a dry ground, changed sides and the approach of the season’s end it would not have been a poor game, instead of which the football was of a relentless character as usual, and at times it bore a “heavy” mark with cautions to some players but taken on the whole it was an excellent struggle and the first half was a gem to watch. Afterwards it lapsed a little, purely through the players running themselves out in the hectic first half. First let us sturdy the important changes of team-sheet. Dean returned to Everton’s team and as Stevenson was suffering from neuritis, Coulter was drafted into the inside forward position with Stein as his partner that did not pay, because’s roaming propensity did not assist the attack, which was often straggling and was unbalanced lacking cohesion on the wing, the right wing pair being much more dangerous. Late on the change of position on the left wing led Coulter into Cooper’s greatest display of rugged and sure tackling, and this in a measure kept Liverpool’s victory safe.

Kane Foils Dean.

On the Liverpool side Kane appeared in goal for Riley, who had a damaged leg, and this move left nothing to be desired so much so that Bradshaw and other players took the trouble to shake Kane’s hand, before he left the field. Kane took a well placed Dean header with calm assurance and finally he made a grand save from the same forward, who taking the ball when he was almost on the half turn, let out a smashing shot which Kane covered brilliantly –the save of the day. It was not Kane’s fault a penalty save was not credited to the young goalkeeper; he made a gallant effort to stay Dean’s fast ball delivered from “spot” but only rapped his knuckles the ball flying to the top of the net. This was Everton’s penalty kick and it equalised the one given to Liverpool. These spot kicks were worth a special line. Early on Coulter fell to defence and handled the ball with such definitence that no one argued with Mr. Taylor’s decision. Hodgson scored his second goal in the series of games with Everton. Then came one of those many arguments concerning the position a centre forward takes up when trying to combat a goalkick. Dean knows quite well where he can stand, and the yardage in the penalty box is easy to definite. Kane and a back got ready to take the goal kick and Tennant tried to cover Dean, and in this move Tennant brought Dean down with a pull. At once the referee said “Penalty” and Dean scored in spite of Kane touching the ball. It seemed as if there would be no further score before half-time when work on the left and centre led to a high ball going towards the right side of the “kop” goal. Thomson and Nieuwenhuys leapt to head the ball which fell behind Thomson’s back, and the neat pass forward to Hodgson from the right winger led to a low swerving shot out of Sagar’s reach. This ended the scoring, thanks to Everton’s generally poor inside work and their lack of penetrativences near goal.

Relentless Play.

Kane stood firm when most needed –on two occasion –and Everton had to bow the knee. The game was hard, relentless fluctuating –the losers had one spell of attacking in the second half when it seemed they must score –and it was then Bradshaw, hero of the day Cooper and Tennant put up their brightest wares. All was not plain sailing, however, for the referee Mr. Taylor of Ince, who had to issue cautions to several players. But this must be said; The work of the main man the referee was one of the best fears of this game. He was firm, adamant, and convincing and in the end no one could gainsay that Liverpool had not earned their valuable points. They had a more practical way of advancing they were harder to dispossess, and on the right wing Nieuwenhuys was not often employed, but was always an outstanding menace. Though the line was not well balanced they took their chances and only first-class leaping and catching by Sagar, and a miss by Wright of the simplest chance prevented a further score. It would seem, on this showing, Everton are better when the ground is holding. No one could escape the work Dean did in this game, but the line-up of the rest of the forwards prevented any consecutive football skill or finishing and some of the shooting was –well, not worthy the name of shot. One gives full marks to Geldard, Dean, Thomson, Britton, Sagar and the sturdy backs who “kicked anywhere” for safety. On the winning side, every man was striving desperately and the reappearance of Savage at half-back was noticeable in the late stages of play, and when a throw in was being delivered, Nieuwenhuys was quite the best and most dangerous forward, fast, elusive, and centering finely from all angles, but here again the line was jagged and the left pair were held up by Britton and Jones. Outstanding in the victory line were Kane, the backs –Cooper especially so –Bradshaw, and McDougall. Teams: - Liverpool: - Kane goal; Cooper and Tennant, backs; Savage, Bradshaw and McDougall (captain), half-backs; Niewenhuys, Hodgson, Wright, Johnson, and Hanson, forwards. Everton: - Sagar, goal; Jackson and Jones, backs; Britton, Gee and Thomson, half-backs; Geldard Cunliffe, Dean (captain), Coulter and Stein forwards. Referee Mr. A. Taylor if Ince (Wigan).

LIVERPOOL’S VICTORY
By John Peel.

Meetings between Everton and Liverpool always make great appeal and for a mid-week fixture the crowd yesterday was a large one, and though the game was not of a high standard, the play was always contested with spirit and enthusiasm. Liverpool’s success by the odd goal of three brings their record equal to that of Everton (37 points), and the Anfield club have a game in hand.

Kane Makes His Mark.

A notable feature of the game was the fine display given by Kane a young player who made his first appearance in First Division football, for Liverpool in the absence of Riley, injured, he took over the onerous position with skill and confidence. Liverpool have always been happy in their selection of goalkeepers, and it would seem that they have in the young Workington custodian the making of a worthy follower of such players as Hardy; Campbell, Scott, and Riley. His display all round was smart, but two clearance from Stein and Dean were particularly good. Kane has done well in the Central league side for some time, and he can look back on his first “Derby” with satisfaction and pride. He promises to keep up the Anfield tradition.

Dickinson To Lead Everton.

The younger generation of footballers are getting their chances on Merseyside just now, and the following the introduction by Everton of two cal backs, Jackson and Jones, the club on Saturday, Everton are being out another promising recruit in Dickinson, who is to lead the attack at Portsmouth, in place of dean, who was injured yesterday’s match Dickinson came to Everton on trial from the Chester district and so well, did he play in the central league side that he was quickly signed on as a professional. He started scoring right away on the introduction to the reserves side, and he rarely missed obtaining a goal or two, since he, joined the club a dashing leader he holds out promise of being almost valuable addition to the staff. He signed amateur forms for Everton in September having play for guilden Sutton in the Chester and district league. Well built for the position, Dickinson scored twenty goals in the central league and seven in Lancashire cup-ties Stevenson will be fit to resume, and the team will therefore be: Sagar; Jackson, Jones; Britton Gee, Thomson; Geldard, Cunliffe, Dickinson, Stevenson, Coulter.

Copyright - Liverpool Daily Post and Mercury - Transcribed by http://www.bluecorrespondent.co.nr

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